How to build a social media analytics platform to sell tickets to your next concert

July 12, 2021 0 Comments

You’ve seen a lot of great content about how to build an analytics platform for concerts.

Now it’s time to build one that will help you sell tickets for your next one.

We’re about to learn how to use Twitter’s new GraphQL API to help you build a Twitter Analytics platform that sells tickets.

GraphQL stands for Graphical Query Language.

It’s a powerful query language for building complex queries.

It lets you build queries that can take in data, and it lets you easily write query DSLs that can run in different languages, like Python or Go.

So you can write a query that looks like this:1) query(s,event_id)2) query([event_name] ,[event_duration])3) query({event_type})4) query()5) query(“title”, [event_title])We can now use this query language to make queries about event_id and event_type that can be used by Twitter to populate a chart, like this one:If we had to write a Python script that looked like this, we would have to write the query to do things like get the total number of attendees for a given event and then find out how many tickets are sold for that event.

This would be very inefficient.

Graphql lets you write query functions that do this for you, like:1.

query(event_url,event)2.

query([ event_title ])3.

query({ event_name })4.

query(‘event_details’)5.

query(“time”, [time])So this query lets us write the following Python code:1).

query(events,event,event[‘time’])2).

query([events[‘time’]])3).

query({ time })4).

query(“ticket_number”)5).

query(‘ticket_type’)6).

query($event_price)So this code will output this chart:1), event = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100)Here’s how it looks like:Let’s look at a slightly different version of this query, to make sure we understand what’s happening:1.), event = (event[‘name’] in (‘Bobcat Goldthwait’, ‘Foster the People’, ‘Django Unchained’))2.), event.event_info()3), event.time()4).

event(event[‘type’])5), event(1).query(‘title’, event[‘title’])6), event(‘time’, event[1]).query({ time });Now that we know how to make this query work, let’s see how to get the information about tickets for that concert that’s stored in GraphQL.

First, we need to add the GraphQL source code to our Twitter analytics site.2).

Twitter analytics (blog,blog_url: ‘https://twitter.com/analytics’, analytics_source: ‘http://www.twitter.org/analytical-source/’, source_code: ‘{% url %}’, )3).

Tweet analytics (blogs,blogs_url:’https://www:wordpress.org/, analytics_Source: ‘//www.wordpress.com/?tags=twitter%20analytics&utm_source=twitter&utm=tags&utm=-‘ )4).

Twitter Analytics (blogs_path: ‘blog’, blogs_url_css: ‘article.css’, analytics: { ‘title’ : ‘Twitter Analytics’ })Now, we can add this query to our analytics site using our existing queries.1).

Query(“ticketId”, event[‘ticketId’])Next, we want to add a new query to the analytics site that we’re not using in the query above.

We’re going to add this new query, but not as a query for this specific event.

To add a query to this event, we’ll need to create a new source for it:1.) query(ticketId)2).

Query({ ticket